Halloween Picture Taking and Photo Storage Tips

superhero costumes
Photo by Steven Libralon on Unsplash

Trick or treating on Halloween night is more than just scary costumes. For many families, it’s a time to stroll around neighborhoods and even many churches have celebrations in their parking lots.

Of course, it’s a time to pull out the smartphones or digital cameras and snap away.

Since it’s getting dark early, get your pictures taken before the sun goes down.

Here are useful tips from the pros on taking pictures and then read on to get acquainted with photo storage and out-of-date media conversion.

 

Time of Day

Twilight is the best time to get your outdoor shots, so get your costumed Trick or Treaters photographed outside from an hour before the sun sets to at least 20 minutes before nighttime.

A writer in Techlicious says the glow from the jack-o-lantern in twilight produces about the same amount of light as the night sky. Set your smartphone to HDR for the best results in low light conditions.

Starting early guarantees you’ll get good shots, even if you use your smartphone’s camera.

 

Spoooooky Silouhettes

Twilight also casts decent shadows or can make bare trees seem ominous. Any object—or Halloween costume—that’s readily identifiable by its shape is a good candidate for a silhouette shot. Before sunset, find a spot with a clear line of sight to the sky with your subject’s back to the sun, so your subject won’t have to compete with other objects on the horizon. As the sun is setting, take photos of your subject with the flash turned off.

Photo by Sašo Tušar on Unsplash

Timing is key, so take your shots about 20 minutes before the sun sets.

 

Get Eye Level with the Kids

Don’t shoot looking down on the kids. It’s best to get eye level with them, otherwise you’re going to “trivialize” them, say the staff at the New York Institute of Photography. If you can lie on the ground or have them stand on steps, then you’re looking up at them and that makes them a wee bit more intimidating (or cute) in their costumes.

 

Get the Best Part of the Costume

The eyes and faces are always winners in picture taking. If the mask is the best part of the costume, then get good shots of it. Go for the torso and forget about the shoes, unless they really make a fashion statement.

If taking pictures of two or more then the subjects need to crowd together, touching.

Now Organize and Store Those Shots

Remember that taking the shots is only the first step in enjoying your pictures and then saving them for the future.

Let’s organize. This is where I step in as a photo coach.

Don’t save every photo. I know it’s tough, but you’re only going to remember or need a few of all the pics you take. We often shoot when they’re young and we seem to get fewer pics by the time they’re teenagers. So corral those teens to get some good shots.

Storing the photos is key.

Tree with fall colors
Halloween is a turning point in the seasons and our lives; photo by Don Simkovich

I offer long-term digital photo solutions in online albums where you own the space so there’s no advertising or marketing using your data. You don’t have to worry about the Terms of Service changing on you or getting kicked out of your account since you’re not renting.

The online storage system I use guarantees that your storage will last a lifetime, plus 100 years. I’ll gladly explain how that works.

You can share the photo albums with friends and family or keep them private.

 

Turn Them into Gifts

Once you’ve got the shots, let’s them into photo books to give as mementos or make them part of a collection from earlier in the year.

Family photos are often are most cherished possessions, so that’s why I enjoy helping families safeguard them for generations and generations.

 

Here’s an idea–if you have VHS tapes from when you were young, you can convert those older forms of media to digital formats. This way, you can look at Halloween throughout the years and see how it’s changed and how it’s stayed the same.

 

I’m Here to Help

Office Hours with Melody Event
Melody Whitehead, Safeguard Your Memories

 

Even

 

I have 26 years of experience helping clients organize and preserve their photos as a photo coach.

I believe in following Best Practices and making use of the most effective technology.

Let me know how I can help you.

Contact me for a brief consultation.

 

Fun Picture Events

Get help with your pictures and get questions answered at upcoming Safeguard Your Memory events.

Check the schedule from our Events web page to choose your topic of interest and time.

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